Analysis and summary of the indolence

Summary and Analysis La Indolencia de los Filipinos, more popularly known in its English version, "The Indolence of the Filipinos," is a exploratory essay written by Philippine national hero Dr. Jose Rizal, to explain the alleged idleness of his people during the Spanish colonization. Rizal pointed out that long before the coming of the Spaniards, the Filipinos were industrious and hardworking. The Spanish reign brought about a decline in economic activities because of certain causes:

Analysis and summary of the indolence

Abuse of land lords ecnomenderos Permission to labor KASAMA System Absence of encouragement from the government no aid for poor crops does not seek market for its products Wrong teaching: If the rich man will not go to heaven.

False teaching of church Gambling — promise of sudden wealth Discrimination on education Spaniards insisted to Filipinos: Jose Rizal, to explain the alleged idleness of his people during the Spanish colonization.

Rizal pointed out that long before the coming of the Spaniards, the Filipinos were industrious and hardworking. The Spanish reign brought about a decline in economic activities because of certain causes: First, the establishment of the Galleon Trade cut off all previous associations of the Philippines with other countries in Asia and the Middle East.

As a result, businesswas only conducted with Spain through Mexico. Because of this, the small businessesand handicraft industries that flourished during the pre-Spanish period gradually disappeared.

Because of the wars between Spain and other countries in Europe as well as the Muslims in Mindanao, the Filipinos were compelled to work in shipyards, roads, and other public works, abandoning agriculture, industry, and commerce.

Analysis and summary of the indolence

With no arms to defend themselves, the natives were killed, their houses burned, and their lands destroyed. As a result of this, the Filipinos were forced to become nomads, lost interest in cultivating their lands or in rebuilding the industries that were shut down, and simply became submissive to the mercy of God.

Fourth, there was a crooked system of education, if it was to be considered aneducation. What was being taught in the schools were repetitive prayers and other things that could not be used by the students to lead the country to progress.

There were no courses in Agriculture, Industry, etc. Fifth, the Spanish rulers were a bad example to despise manual labor. The officials reported to work at noon and left early, all the while doing nothing in line with their duties.

The women were seen constantly followed by servants who dressed them and fanned them — personal things which they ought to have done for themselves. Sixth, gambling was established and widely propagated during those times. Almost everyday there were cockfights, and during feast days, the government officials and friars were the first to engange in all sorts of bets and gambles.

Seventh, there was a crooked system of religion. Lastly, the taxes were extremely high, so much so that a huge portion of what they earned went to the government or to the friars. When the object of their labor was removed and they were exploited, they were reduced to inaction.

Rizal admitted that the Filipinos did not work so hard because they were wise enough to adjust themselves to the warm, tropical climate. Truth is, before the Spaniards arrived on these lands, the natives were industriously conducting business with China, Japan, Arabia, Malaysia, and other countries in the Middle East.

Another thing that we might add that had caused this indolence, is the lack of unity among the Filipino people. In the absence of unity and oneness, the people did not have the power to fight the hostile attacks of the government and of the other forces of society.

There would also be no voice, no leader, to sow progress and to cultivate it, so that it may be reaped in due time. In such a condition, the Philippines remained a country that was lifeless, dead, simply existing and not living.

It is not only the Philippines, but also other countries, that may be called indolent, depending on the criteria upon which such a label is based. Man cannot work without resting, and if in doing so he is considered lazy, they we could say that all men are indolent. One cannot blame a country that was deprived of its dignity, to have lost its will to continue building its foundation upon the backs of its people, especially when the fruits of their labor do not so much as reach their lips.

From the SparkNotes Blog

When we spend our entire lives worshipping such a cruel and inhumane society, forced upon us by aliens who do not even know our motherland, we are destined to tire after a while. We are not fools, we are not puppets who simply do as we are commanded — we are human beings, who are motivated by our will towards the accomplishment of our objectives, and who strive for the preservation of our race.

When this fundamental aspect of our existence is denied of us, who can blame us if we turn idle? More essays like this:The speaker recounts a morning when three figures appeared to him out of the blue.

He describes their dress as Grecian, and says they resembled figures on an urn because they hold hands and rotate around, as if the urn was being turned.

SUMMARY OF Indolence of the Filipinos. Indolence of the Filipinos (“La Indolencia de los Filipinos”) The essay itself originally appeared in the Filipino forthrightly review, La Solidaridad, of.

Ode on Indolence Summary. In the first stanza, Keats’s speaker describes a vision he had one morning of three strange figures wearing white robes and “placid sandals.” The figures passed by in profile, and the speaker describes their passing by comparing them to figures carved into the side of a marble urn, or vase.

In the letter to George and Georgiana, Keats described his indolence: ‘This is the only happiness; and is a rare instance of advantage in the body overpowering the Mind.’ The ode itself is the least well-known of the six great odes of The Indolence of the Filipinos: Analysis La Indolencia de los Filipinos, more popularly known in its English version, “The Indolence of the Filipinos,” is a exploratory essay written by Philippine national hero Dr.

Jose Rizal, to explain the alleged idleness of his people during the Spanish colonization. Ode on Indolence Summary. In the first stanza, Keats’s speaker describes a vision he had one morning of three strange figures wearing white robes and “placid sandals.” The figures passed by in profile, and the speaker describes their passing by comparing them to .

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